3 thoughts on “The Tree of Life (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]

  1. A MASTERPIECE THAT PUSHES THE BOUNDERIES OF WHAT FILM CAN DO Ingmar Bergman observed that so far, film is in its infancy. Pure cinema is a film vocabulary that is just being developed. Most films tell a story, are easily readable and digested. But Tree of Life is a work of art that pushes at the boundaries of what we expect even from a Malick film. When I first saw the film I admired it, but sighed at all the indulgences. (the dinosaurs!) (I thought then). That was in a movie theater – I returned to it at my computer, in a calm state, and to my…

  2. Poetic Drama Exploring the Meaning of Death and Childhood The viewer is immediately aware that a great tragedy, the untimely death of a son, is the event the movie centers around. However, at the beginning this death means little more to the viewer than the tragedy of any other stranger. However, as the story flashes back in time to the childhood of this unfortunate child, the reality of the pain and the significance of the tragedy takes on layers of meaning and pain. The most terrible angst is felt in witnessing the father’s mistakes with his sons:…

  3. The power of love Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life is a lyrical masterpiece. It is also the most audacious meditation on grace, suffering and human nature that I have ever seen. The sweep of ideas and the sincerity and honesty with which Malick presents the redemptive power of love, would, in the hands of a lesser filmmaker, come off as pretentious and self-absorbed (as many critics have accused Malick of being). But far from pretentious and self-absorbed, I found Malick’s film to be heartfelt, thoughtful,…

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